About me

This is the blog of Gina Fierlafijn Reddie. I am a postgraduate student, MSc in Digital Education, Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, and started in in 2010.

This is my final module before embarking on the dissertation.

I started off my learning journey at the University in Brussels, graduating in 1983 (in communication studies, on film semiotics). Back then I developed an interest in computer graphics, doing some freelance writing and bits of research on the topic. I ended up spending  time at St Martin’s School of Art in London, which ran the (very first ?) course (also modular) on ‘Graphic Design with Computers’ organised by John Lansdown and Gillian Crampton-Smith, two pioneers in the field. I relocated to London and joined, almost by chance,  a couple of CAD studios but my intention was never really to be a designer, I wanted to research and write on the topic of CGI but found it hard to get research funding. So eventually after 25 years or so I am finally getting there…

My real passion is art, especially painting. I have an interest in aesthetics and hope to develop a focus in these next few months around the topic of digitally mediated art spaces.

My partner is the abstract painter Ian Reddie and we have a studio in the Art’s Complex in Edinburgh. I am always on the look out for exhibition opportunities, so do get in touch if you know of large, preferably, industrial spaces.

The day job is spent at the University of Edinburgh supporting a research community.

The image on the website mast is by Ian Reddie and entitled, Craigleith and the Bass, a digital composition he produced in 2006.

 

 

4 Responses to “About me”

  1. Philip Devine January 11, 2013 at 5:24 pm #

    ‘Graphic Design with Computers’ when was that course? Wonder we didn’t bump into each other in London. Worked in early MultiMedia in and around Soho in early 90′s, also was part of Garden Studio across the road from St Martins, before moving to Soho ‘Ganton St’ off Carnaby St, through the late 80′s. Interested in your abstract painter – partner, my daughter is in her first year of painting at Edinburgh ECA.

    Digitally mediated art spaces – interesting! I struggle with this one (if I know what you mean?). How does the artists individual vision reconcile with ubiquity and openness – fluidity etc. I can see a type of performance art in ‘digitally mediated art spaces’ with limited or defined outcomes, but an artists individual reflection of life and the world we live defines meaning. For instance I was struck by ‘John Bellany’ at the national, by the power of an individuals response to epic themes, how would this be this translated in a digitally mediated art space? Is this ushering in the end of the post modern (if that’s possible).

  2. Giraf87 January 11, 2013 at 8:22 pm #

    The course was in 1986-1987. Full of graphic designers, me the odd one out. It was good fun and quite unique in Europe. There was lots of equipment you could try out (Plutos and Applemacs, and we did Turtle programming… ) it was a great environment. I moved out of London in 1989 and I ended up working for Aldus UK (pre-Adobe period) looking after Freehand, PageMaker and Hypercard, gosh wish I spent more time on the latter one…. I then had a few babies and that brought a new career shift.

    ‘….the power of an individuals response to epic themes, how would this be this translated in a digitally mediated art space’ well this is exactly it. There is a continuous feed between the material/immaterial which is shaping our daily experiences, influencing what we see, hear understand. I am quite interested in these smartphone apps that deliver art into your pocket, literally. But the business models for these are far from aesthetically motivated. Yet can these apps produce an aesthetic experience? I like to believe they can, trying to work this one out really, part of my dissertation idea…

    • Phil Devine January 14, 2013 at 9:26 pm #

      “There is a continuous feed between the material/immaterial which is shaping our daily experiences, influencing what we see, hear understand” – Continuous feed between the material/immaterial is as you have indicated permanent. So that’s the end of painting then?

      • Giraf87 January 14, 2013 at 10:07 pm #

        no, I don’t think the practice will disappear, but the way art is being disseminated, already has been affected. Art education too. When one can visit galleries online, and with the economic considerations (staff costs, maintenance of buildings, travel costs) it may be more attractive for the institutions to turn to,promote via the immaterial.

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