Comments for Distance No Object http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar Gina's E-learning and Digital Cultures site - part of the MSc in E-learning at the University of Edinburgh Wed, 09 Jul 2014 20:01:53 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.1 Comment on aesthetics and the new mobilities paradigm – Sheller and Urry by Giraf87 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/17/aesthetics-and-the-new-mobilities-paradigm-sheller-and-urry/#comment-36321 Giraf87 Wed, 09 Jul 2014 20:01:53 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/?p=1332#comment-36321 hi Albert thanks for your comment. This blog was actually part of a course module that was completed last year and I don't often check it.But as it happens I am very much looking into mobility as it is part of my dissertation I am currently writing up. What you are suggestion is actually one of the criticism of Peter Merriman in 'Rethinking Mobile Methods', 2013 as he writes What I want to argue, though, is that a conceptualisation of mobilities research and mobile methods as social science research is in danger of limiting academic work to interventions in the social, economic and political realms, whereas a broader understanding of mobilities underpinned by the arts and humanities (as well as social sciences) might highlight the diverse ways in which critical research and practice might unfold, ranging from creative artistic interventions and walks, to the production of performances and plays. Thanks for explaining your reservations and reminding me of Merriman too, as I had planned to incorporate this into my critique. I enjoy the mobilties readings on paradigm and methods, but it can be quite disparate too... With regards to trajectories, you may be interested in the writing on rhizome by Deleuze and Guattari, I have a Pinterest board on this http://www.pinterest.com/giraf87/rhizome-deleuze-guattari/ hi Albert

thanks for your comment. This blog was actually part of a course module that was completed last year and I don’t often check it.But as it happens I am very much looking into mobility as it is part of my dissertation I am currently writing up.

What you are suggestion is actually one of the criticism of Peter Merriman in ‘Rethinking Mobile Methods’, 2013 as he writes

What I want to argue, though, is that a conceptualisation of mobilities research and mobile methods as social science research is in danger of limiting academic work to interventions in the social, economic and political realms, whereas a broader understanding of mobilities underpinned by the arts and humanities (as well as social sciences) might highlight the diverse ways in which critical research and practice might unfold, ranging from creative artistic interventions and walks, to the production of performances and plays.

Thanks for explaining your reservations and reminding me of Merriman too, as I had planned to incorporate this into my critique. I enjoy the mobilties readings on paradigm and methods, but it can be quite disparate too…

With regards to trajectories, you may be interested in the writing on rhizome by Deleuze and Guattari, I have a Pinterest board on this

http://www.pinterest.com/giraf87/rhizome-deleuze-guattari/

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Comment on aesthetics and the new mobilities paradigm – Sheller and Urry by Albert Mayr http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/17/aesthetics-and-the-new-mobilities-paradigm-sheller-and-urry/#comment-36038 Albert Mayr Sat, 05 Jul 2014 17:19:43 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/?p=1332#comment-36038 Hi Gira (or is it Gina?) and all, Thanks for posting all this. I am getting into this new mobilities paradigm only now, but as a composer/artist have been involved for many years in exploring possibilities with, for instance, moving performers in open spaces and the like. My point of reference has been, and still is Time Geography. What leaves me a bit puzzled in the 'new mobilities' is the separation of the movements from the stationary moments. I prefer looking at what in Time Geography are called 'trajectories' that include both movements and stationary times at different 'stations'. More than the question of moving art works (and I mean moving in physical space, the movements in virtual space require another discussion) I am concerned with the fact that a) environmental aesthetics deals primarily with static configurations and has so far not developed a terminology for dynamic configurations (with possible parameters being, for instance, densities, rate of change etc.) and b) - a corollary of a) - the whole complex of trajectoiries is, so far, not the object of aesthetic consideration and planning. While, next to the predominant efficiency-oriented studies of mobility now experiential aspects are beginning to be considered, there is nothing comparable to the vast repertoire of aesthetic thoughts and practices available for static configurations. And, as I know from experience, the mere idea of an aesthetic approach to space-time issues is very hard, if not impossible, to convey to the "professionales" in this area. Hi Gira (or is it Gina?) and all, Thanks for posting all this. I am getting into this new mobilities paradigm only now, but as a composer/artist have been involved for many years in exploring possibilities with, for instance, moving performers in open spaces and the like. My point of reference has been, and still is Time Geography. What leaves me a bit puzzled in the ‘new mobilities’ is the separation of the movements from the stationary moments. I prefer looking at what in Time Geography are called ‘trajectories’ that include both movements and stationary times at different ‘stations’. More than the question of moving art works (and I mean moving in physical space, the movements in virtual space require another discussion) I am concerned with the fact that a) environmental aesthetics deals primarily with static configurations and has so far not developed a terminology for dynamic configurations (with possible parameters being, for instance, densities, rate of change etc.) and b) – a corollary of a) – the whole complex of trajectoiries is, so far, not the object of aesthetic consideration and planning. While, next to the predominant efficiency-oriented studies of mobility now experiential aspects are beginning to be considered, there is nothing comparable to the vast repertoire of aesthetic thoughts and practices available for static configurations. And, as I know from experience, the mere idea of an aesthetic approach to space-time issues is very hard, if not impossible, to convey to the “professionales” in this area.

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Comment on Dicomed by Sharon http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/01/14/dicomed/#comment-18821 Sharon Mon, 23 Dec 2013 05:36:19 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/01/14/dicomed/#comment-18821 I worked on one of these for several years, doing logos, presentation graphics - some for multiprojector shows. For it's time, it was a *wonderful* piece of equipment. Honestly, I miss the responsiveness of RISC processors...but I certainly don't miss the storage and memory limitations. :-) The ergonomic design was truly "win". Would love to see something like this again with current technology, but with this "station" design...for it's time, it was beautiful. I worked on one of these for several years, doing logos, presentation graphics – some for multiprojector shows. For it’s time, it was a *wonderful* piece of equipment. Honestly, I miss the responsiveness of RISC processors…but I certainly don’t miss the storage and memory limitations. :-)
The ergonomic design was truly “win”. Would love to see something like this again with current technology, but with this “station” design…for it’s time, it was beautiful.

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Comment on Summary tumblog: Distance No Object by our distance education http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/04/07/summary-tumblog-distance-no-object/#comment-4535 our distance education Mon, 08 Apr 2013 03:36:23 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/?p=1663#comment-4535 Helpful feature is always praise worthy. Educational informative entry is more acceptable to all viewers . Thanks a lot for sharing the effective feature. Helpful feature is always praise worthy. Educational informative entry is more acceptable to all viewers . Thanks a lot for sharing the effective feature.

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Comment on Deleuze & Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus by John David Ebert by Giraf87 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/29/deleuze-guattaris-a-thousand-plateaus-by-john-david-ebert/#comment-4390 Giraf87 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 09:04:04 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/29/deleuze-guattaris-a-thousand-plateaus-by-john-david-ebert/#comment-4390 now I have read this chapter in a 1000 Plateaus, John David Erbert's audio recordings are actually very helpful in my learning process and understanding of the first chapter on Rhizome (part 1 and 2 only, the other parts refer to other chapters in the book) He explains very clearly the main points in the chapter,i.e. the principle of connection and heterogeneity, multiplicity, rupture, cartography & decalcomania. now I have read this chapter in a 1000 Plateaus, John David Erbert’s audio recordings are actually very helpful in my learning process and understanding of the first chapter on Rhizome (part 1 and 2 only, the other parts refer to other chapters in the book)

He explains very clearly the main points in the chapter,i.e. the principle of connection and heterogeneity, multiplicity, rupture, cartography & decalcomania.

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Comment on The digital life of paintings by Giraf87 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/01/24/the-digital-life-of-paintings/#comment-4048 Giraf87 Tue, 02 Apr 2013 21:36:48 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/?p=514#comment-4048 I just read the chapter Rhizome in Deleuze and Guattari's A 1000 Plateaus. I can say the chapter is utterly thrilling, but based on a first read, I believe there is no immediate theoretical input for aesthetic online experiences. The rhizome can support the idea of 'immanence' though, something artists can facilitate. I just read the chapter Rhizome in Deleuze and Guattari’s A 1000 Plateaus. I can say the chapter is utterly thrilling, but based on a first read, I believe there is no immediate theoretical input for aesthetic online experiences. The rhizome can support the idea of ‘immanence’ though, something artists can facilitate.

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Comment on Deleuze conference by Nikki Bourke http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/29/anything-on-deleuze/#comment-3974 Nikki Bourke Mon, 01 Apr 2013 20:55:34 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/29/anything-on-deleuze/#comment-3974 Thanks for this link Gina - This link makes me feel like I'm a five year old with free run of a sweet shop! Thanks for this link Gina – This link makes me feel like I’m a five year old with free run of a sweet shop!

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Comment on Gatherings by cmeckenstock http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/26/gatherings/#comment-3766 cmeckenstock Thu, 28 Mar 2013 10:47:17 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/?p=1494#comment-3766 We are 'haunted' by the voices of the past! Thank you for this really uncanny description of the learning process! :) We are ‘haunted’ by the voices of the past! Thank you for this really uncanny description of the learning process! :)

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Comment on Deleuze: societies of control by cmeckenstock http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/27/deleuze-societies-of-control/#comment-3765 cmeckenstock Thu, 28 Mar 2013 10:44:07 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/03/27/deleuze-societies-of-control/#comment-3765 Thank you for posting this Gina. I have not started to look at what Deleuze work entails but this is a good introduction for me. Lots to think about. Thank you for posting this Gina. I have not started to look at what Deleuze work entails but this is a good introduction for me. Lots to think about.

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Comment on YouTube community rules by Giraf87 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/02/28/youtube-community-rules/#comment-3597 Giraf87 Sat, 23 Mar 2013 21:55:42 +0000 http://edc13.education.ed.ac.uk/ginar/2013/02/28/youtube-community-rules/#comment-3597 YouTube reaches a billion monthly viewers, boosted by 'Generation C' A key thing about Gen C, identified by the Nielsen Research Group, is that unlike the Generation X and Y of the past, they aren't defined by their age. Instead, it's their "connected behaviour" that's the common thread: they constantly switch between devices, are deeply engaged with online video (both for watching and creating), thrive on the community around it, and are expert "curators" – able to find the content they want. I was intrigued by the idea of 'community around it'....Maybe what is mean the community of users, rather than a particular group? http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/21/youtube-billion-monthy-viewers-generation-c YouTube reaches a billion monthly viewers, boosted by ‘Generation C’

A key thing about Gen C, identified by the Nielsen Research Group, is that unlike the Generation X and Y of the past, they aren’t defined by their age. Instead, it’s their “connected behaviour” that’s the common thread: they constantly switch between devices, are deeply engaged with online video (both for watching and creating), thrive on the community around it, and are expert “curators” – able to find the content they want.

I was intrigued by the idea of ‘community around it’….Maybe what is mean the community of users, rather than a particular group?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/21/youtube-billion-monthy-viewers-generation-c

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